The United States Before the Civil War (A True Book (Relaunch)) (Paperback)

The United States Before the Civil War (A True Book (Relaunch)) By KaaVonia Hinton Cover Image

The United States Before the Civil War (A True Book (Relaunch)) (Paperback)

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A fascinating series that examines the causes and consequences of one of the deadliest conflicts in our country's history.

America in the years leading up to the Civil War was more like two countries than one. The North had an industrial economy and the South had a farming economy. By 1804, slavery had been outlawed in the North but the Southern economy was still wholly dependent upon the labor of enslaved workers. As the country grew, so did tensions between the two regions. Read all about the era that culminated in the greatest threat to our nation.

About This Series:

The Civil War took place in America between April 1861 and April 1865. During the four-year struggle between the North and the South, approximately 10,000 battles were fought on land and sea, leaving 620,000 dead. As a result of the war, more than three million enslaved people gained their freedom. The four books in the "Exploring the Civil War" series examine the war's key people, places, and events, and its causes and consequences, making them the perfect tools to introduce children to one of the defining events in American history.

KaaVonia Hinton earned a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Arts from NC A&T State University and a Ph.D. from the Ohio State University. Currently, she is a professor in the Teaching & Learning Department at Old Dominion University and the author of several nonfiction books for children about United States history, including the Civil War. She feels deeply connected to the first British colonies in the U.S., as she grew up in rural North Carolina and lives in Virginia.
Product Details ISBN: 9781546136323
ISBN-10: 1546136320
Publisher: Children's Press
Publication Date: January 7th, 2025
Pages: 48
Language: English
Series: A True Book (Relaunch)